Solidarity Week Event Schedule: February 27 – March 2, 2012

Posted: February 15, 2012 in Uncategorized
Monday, February 27
Film: The End of Poverty? Think Again
2:00 PM
Telus 236/238

Global poverty did not just happen. It began with military conquest, slavery and colonization that resulted in the seizure of land, minerals and forced labor. Today, the problem persists because of unfair debt, trade and tax policies — in other words, wealthy countries taking advantage of poor, developing countries. The End of Poverty? explains how today’s financial crisis is a direct consequence of these unchallenged policies that have lasted centuries. Consider that 20% of the planet’s population uses 80% of its resources and consumes 30% more than the planet can regenerate. At this rate, to maintain our lifestyle means more and more people will sink below the poverty line. Can we really end poverty within our current economic system? Think again. Facebook Event Page: http://www.facebook.com/events/392505470765674/#!/events/392505470765674/

Monday, February 27
Privilege, Guilt, and Responsibility
5:00 PM
Aboriginal Student Council Lounge 220 North Power Plant

Whether it be for the way you used to think/talk/act or even actions of your ancestors, guilt is not a valid reason to remove yourself from the fight for social change. Join us as we discuss moving towards an understanding of privilege as access to power that demands responsibility within progressive movements and the fight against dominant oppressive structures. Facebook Event Page: http://www.facebook.com/events/392505470765674/#!/events/253907078021173/

Tuesday, February 28th
Film: Bottled Life
2:00 PM
TELUS 217/219

Can you imagine someone turning ordinary water into a billion dollar business? The secret key to the blue gold lies in the hand of Swiss transnational nutrition company Nestlé. Nestlé is generating 10 billion dollars a year with bottled water. A Zurich-based journalist starts investigating into his country’s most powerful corporation. He wants to find out what is behind Nestlé’s fastest growing line of business. The journey leads him from Switzerland to the USA and Pakistan. He gets involved in a harsh fight between citizens trying to protect their local sources and an international giant. Sponsored by UofA Council of Canadians
Tuesday, February 28th
What is Solidarity?
5:00 PM
Telus 236/238
Join the Solidarity Week Organizing Committee as we build a working definition of solidarity to continue building working relationships that strengthen the local social and political movements in Edmonton. For the past three years we have focused on uncovering the legacy of colonialism and decolonizing ourselves. We are now asking how we bring these discussion to other organizations and movements. Help carve the path! Facebook Event Page: http://www.facebook.com/events/358520897505634/
Tuesday, February 28th
Rouge Slam Night
8:30 PM
10111 – 117 Street (Corner of 117 Street and Jasper Avenue)
Join us for the Rouge Poetry Slam!6 poets will compete each night in the hopes of being crowned the champion and securing a spot on the 2012 Edmonton Slam Team that will go on to represent Edmonton at the Canadian Festival of Spoken Word 2012. Come out to cheer on your favorites and see Edmonton poets at their best! It is going to be amazing! What is a Poetry Slam? Simply put, poetry slam is the competitive art of performance poetry. It puts a dual emphasis on writing and performance, encouraging poets to focus on what they’re saying and how they’re saying it. Who can Slam? Anyone who has original works of poetry is invited to join! Poets are to have 3 poems prepared; each poem should be no more than 3 minutes long. Sign up for the slam will be done in advance up to one hour before the Slam. Only 6 poets will slam a night. Spots for the slam are first come first serve! Facebook Event Page: http://www.facebook.com/events/392505470765674/#!/events/229418280484875/
Wednesday, February 29th
Indigenous Peoples and the State: Multinationalism – Multiculturalism for Real
5:00 PM
Telus 236/238
In the last 10 years the Movement Towards Socialism (MAS) in Bolivia has implemented profound socio-economic and political changes. It has re-written it’s constitution through a process of popular assembly and has introduced various concepts, including ”nacionalidad,” which translates to multinationalism. Analyzing the Bolivian context we will open the door to discuss the problems with multiculturalism in Canada, how sometimes First Nations in Canada are equated as yet another cultural group within Canada. Join us as we discuss possibilities for designing a new path for how all peoples engage and interact with the state. Facebook Event Page: http://www.facebook.com/events/392505470765674/#!/events/375268579168443/
Wednesday, February 29th
Film: Bottled Life
7:00 PM
Education South room 129
Can you imagine someone turning ordinary water into a billion dollar business? The secret key to the blue gold lies in the hand of Swiss transnational nutrition company Nestlé. Nestlé is generating 10 billion dollars a year with bottled water. A Zurich-based journalist starts investigating into his country’s most powerful corporation. He wants to find out what is behind Nestlé’s fastest growing line of business. The journey leads him from Switzerland to the USA and Pakistan. He gets involved in a harsh fight between citizens trying to protect their local sources and an international giant. Sponsored by UofA Council of Canadians Facebook Event Page: http://www.facebook.com/events/392505470765674/#!/events/212800722150513/
Thursday, March 1st
Say No to a UofA Honorary Degree for Nestle!
2:30 PM
Timms Centre for the Arts
The University of Alberta has announced that on March 1 it will award an honorary degree to Peter Brabeck-Letmathe, the Chair of Nestlé, the world’s largest multinational food and water corporation and the largest bottled water corporation in the world. While the univers…ity claims that the honorary degree will honour those who have contributed to “the preservation, distribution and management of one of humanity’s most vital resources: water,” the reality is that under Brabeck-Letmathe’s leadership Nestlé has been one of the biggest global voices pushing for the privatization and commodification of water worldwide, is the largest player in the bottled water industry and is depleting aquifers in communities throughout North America and around the world to bottle and sell, is the target of global boycotts for its marketing of breast milk substitutes in violation of international standards, has a long list of labour violations in countries all over the world, and is currently involved in a court case in which Nestlé has admitted it hired agents to spy on the ctivist group ATTAC. Hundreds of students, professors, alumni and concerned citizens have flooded the University demanding that U of A President Samarasekara and Chancellor Hughes revoke the honorary degree to Mr. Brabeck-Letmathe. Join us on March 1 to demonstrate your opposition to the University rewarding this type of corporate record. We also encourage you to register to attend the Who Speaks for Water event where Mr. Brabeck-Letmathe will be given the University’s “highest honour” by visiting www.president.ualberta.ca/waterevent. You can also send messages to the University at: http://canadians.org/action/2012/nestle.html

Thursday March 1st Feminism vs. Womanism
5:00 PM
Aboriginal Student Council Lounge 220 North Power Plant

Womanism usually centers on African American women’s experiences however, many colored women have also adopted this term. Womanists are concerned very much with both black women and black men. Womanism was popular during the 1960’s when Black women were not able to relate to the feminist movement. This discussion is not meant to be academic but rather for us to discuss the historical context in which womanism emerged and how feminists today can learn from these experiences. Further, we live in a society that is defined by discrimination and our discussion should allow us to understand how we act out gender norms and their effects on society. In order to stand in solidarity, sisters and brothers need to unite and the first step is discussion. Let us work through the historical context of womanism and the present day context of feminism in understanding how to move forward.

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